Questions about Pharmacy

Question: How long does it take to finish schooling for pharmacy?

Answer: The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree program requires at least 2 years of specific undergraduate college study followed by 4 academic years (or 3 calendar years) of professional pharmacy study. Most students enter a pharmacy degree program after completion of 3 or more years of college.

Some pharmacy schools accept students immediately after they graduate from high school. Pharmacy schools that accept all or most students directly from high school are referred to as “0-6” programs because these students can complete their pre-pharmacy and professional study within 6-years after high school. Students enrolled in a “0-6” program who successfully complete the first 2-years of pre-professional study (and any other stated contingencies) are guaranteed admission into the 4-year professional pharmacy degree program. Below are AACP institutions classified as “0-6” degree programs.

·Albany College of Pharmacy
·Duquesne University
·Florida A&M University
·Hampton University
·Massachusetts-Boston
·Northeastern University
·Ohio Northern University
·Philadelphia College of Pharmacy
·Rutgers University
·St. John’s University
·St. Louis College of Pharmacy
·University of Mississippi
·University of Rhode Island
·University of Texas at Austin

Elisabeth J. "Libby" Ross, MA
Director, PharmCAS and Student Affairs
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
1426 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-739-2330, x1024
LRoss@aacp.org


Question: Is Pharmacy a career that is highly needed?

Answer: Yes. There has never been a better time for students to consider a rewarding career in pharmacy. The demand for trained pharmacy professionals has increased in recent years due to the rapid growth of the health care and pharmaceutical industries, especially for the growing elderly population. The number of pharmacists in health care services is also increasing as pharmacists become more actively involved in drug therapy decision-making for patients of all ages.

There are many practice options for someone who has a pharmacy degree. Approximately 62 percent of pharmacists work in community pharmacies, however, pharmacists are found in a wide variety of settings including hospitals, managed care, public health, armed forces, pharmaceutical industry, government, and more. While responsibilities vary among the different areas of pharmacy practice, the bottom line is that pharmacists help patients get well. Pharmacist responsibilities include a range of care for patients, from dispensing medications to monitoring patient health and progress to maximize their response to the medication. Pharmacists also educate consumers and patients on the use of prescriptions and over-the-counter medications, and advise physicians, nurses, and other health professionals on drug decisions. Pharmacists also provide expertise about the composition of drugs, including their chemical, biological, and physical properties and their manufacture and use. They ensure drug purity and strength and make sure that drugs do not interact in a harmful way. Pharmacists are drug information experts ultimately concerned about their patients' health and wellness.

Elisabeth J. "Libby" Ross, MA
Director, PharmCAS and Student Affairs
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
1426 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-739-2330, x1024
LRoss@aacp.org

Question: Would it be a good idea to work in a Pharmacy as a clerk, so I can get in the environment?

Answer: Yes. Pharmacy colleges encourage or require applicants to have volunteer or paid experience working with patients in a pharmacy or health-related setting (hospital, nursing home, etc.). On-going work or volunteer experience in a pharmacy setting may be an important factor in the admissions process.

Elisabeth J. "Libby" Ross, MA
Director, PharmCAS and Student Affairs
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
1426 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-739-2330, x1024
LRoss@aacp.org


Question: How many science classes would I have to take?

Answer: A sound education in science and math is essential in the preparation for the study of pharmacy. High school science classes are helpful in preparing students for the advanced science courses required in the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree curriculum. High school courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics are required. Four years of science and four years of math are recommended. High school students considering a career in pharmacy should also have good written and verbal communication skills. Prospective pharmacy students are encouraged to take college preparatory classes in areas such as literature, history, government, and humanities in order to become well-rounded individuals. These skills will help create an educational foundation on which to grow. Contrary to popular belief, Latin, while helpful in many aspects, is not essential to admission to pharmacy school.

The undergraduate classes required for admission into a pharmacy degree program vary significantly from one institution to the next. Generally, required undergraduate courses include several courses in the different science disciplines (including chemistry, mathematics, biology, and physics), as well as a variety of non-science courses such as composition and literature. Due to the variations in admission requirements and procedures among the colleges and schools of pharmacy, it is advisable to research different pharmacy programs.

Elisabeth J. "Libby" Ross, MA
Director, PharmCAS and Student Affairs
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
1426 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-739-2330, x1024
LRoss@aacp.org

 

 

 
courtesy of Saint Michael's College
   
 
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